My Adventures in South Korea

Falling into Place

With each week that passes by, I feel more and more at home in Korea. Most people have said that as an expat, every 2-3 months you feel a new emotion about living abroad. Right now, I am loving it here. It’s hard to say how long John and I will be in Korea, but I can’t see myself returning to the US for a while. My sister has been here for almost a year now and feels the same way. Korea is a great place to come and work, if you are looking for something different.

Now that we have fallen into place here, life is good! I can see it being a little rough once the holidays start to approach and not being surrounded by family, but hopefully with the expat community here, we can do some things that are fun and festive. 🙂

This past weekend I was able to get some paint supplies so I’m looking forward to painting soon! Also, Halloween is coming up so I need to think of some fun elementary activities to do with my students. Finally, now that the weather is cooler, John and I will try to go hiking more often. It’s just nice to be outside.

Besides this, nothing too exciting is happening at the moment. I’ll share some pictures from this past week below!

IMG_2497 copy

We bought the dogs little dog house beds. I’m not sure how insulated our apartment is so these will help keep the dogs warmer in the winter.

IMG_2526

Luci and her winter apparel 🙂 Don’t judge lol. Nobody wants to walk directly on snow/ice in the winter. Not even my Florida poms.

IMG_2541

Hints of Autumn

IMG_2543 copy

IMG_2553

My new painting supplies 🙂

DSC_9826 copy

Spending time outside in this gorgeous weather. Before we know it, it will be too cold!

DSC_9787 copy

DSC_9789 copy

At a dog area near our apartment

DSC_9795 copy

DSC_9812 copy

Milo welcomes other dogs. Luci, not so much…lol.

DSC_9817 copy

DSC_9822 copy

Hope you have a great week!

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Falling into Place”

  1. Alex

    Fellow Panama City-ite and UCF graduate here, have loved reading your blog. I’m interested in teaching in Korea/Japan and would love to hear how you went through the process of “vetting” the school before you went over. Main thing I’m worried about is how to differentiate between a good school and a bad school and whether or not I should just go through a recruiting agency. Keep blogging!

    Reply
    • talaghemand

      Hi Alex!

      I am happy you have enjoyed my blog and it’s great to hear that you are interested in teaching in Korea!

      My sister was the one who decided to take a step forward first and come to Korea. She went through a recruiting agency called Adventure Teaching – http://www.adventureteaching.com. They were great with her, listened to what she wanted, helped her get all her paperwork, and then helped her find a job. The great thing with a recruiter is that they do the job hunt for you. With a recruiter, you can tell them what you want, and hopefully they can find it for you. You can always hear about a job through a recruiter and if you don’t like it, then they can find you another. There are many different recruiters out their as well, so if one doesn’t work, you can go through another.

      John and I didn’t come through a recruiter, we applied directly to our school. It wasn’t bad but it was much harder gathering up all the paperwork we needed. I was lucky that my sister still had her checklist of everything necessary! There are different websites that advertise job postings here. I think the most popular one is Dave’s ESL Cafe. Just be careful though because it’s a lot tougher if you don’t know what you need to look for. If I didn’t have my sister here, I would have definitely gone through a recruiter.

      The two biggest differences about schools here are the public school jobs vs. private school jobs.

      Public Schools- You usually are the only native teacher in the school but you get your own classroom. You get paid less and usually get smaller accommodations but you have much more time off! You can be in big cities or you might get placed in small towns. I am not sure how much of a choice you have on where you live though. Finally, you work normal school hrs, like in the states. With Public schools, you have to apply through a program called EPIK – http://www.epik.go.kr
      There are some recruiters that specialize in EPIK but most of them do private school. They tell you all the things you need but I think the biggest thing is a 120 hr TEFL Certification.

      Private Schools- Also known as Hagwons. You work with other native teachers, which is nice. You don’t have a classroom and usually have to go room to room to teach your students. You get paid much more and housing is nicer. You can usually request where you want to live. You work night hours because kids come to hagwons after normal school. A typical day would be something like 3 pm to 10 pm. Standard vacation time is 10 paid days, but some hagwons might give less/more. There are many hagwons, so it’s easier to get a job through them. Most hagwons are typically the same.

      * If you get job offers and they are with hagwons, you can usually search the hagwon name and add “black list” to the search. If the school pops up, then you can read experiences others have had with them.

      I think there will always be people who have had bad and good experiences no matter what school they might be at. Many companies are franchises so one school might be great, while others might not be. The biggest thing to look out for are hagwons that don’t pay on time. If you encounter a lot of reviews about a certain hagwon that does that and doesn’t pay regularly, then stay away!! If you get a good recruiter, they will usually avoid putting you in places like that and will put you in a good company, but its always smart to do research!!

      I hope this can help! 🙂

      Reply
  2. Alex

    Fellow Panama City-ite and UCF graduate here, have loved reading your blog. I’m interested in teaching in Korea/Japan and would love to hear how you went through the process of “vetting” the school before you went over. Main thing I’m worried about is how to differentiate between a good school and a bad school and whether or not I should just go through a recruiting agency. Keep up the great blog!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS

%d bloggers like this: